Time Spent With the Harvard Classics: Paradise Regained – John Milton

John Milton died on November  8, 1674.  

Subsequent to writing Paradise Lost, English poet John Milton published Paradise Regained in 1671.  Both works share similar theological themes and the use of blank verse.  The latter work, however, deals primarily with the temptation of Christ as set out in the Gospel of Luke.

The story is that a Quaker named Thomas Ellwood was studying Latin with Milton and on reading the earlier Paradise Lost.  Ellwood is said to have asked, “(T)hou hast said much here of Paradise lost, but what hast thou to say of Paradise found?”  In response, Milton compose the poem at his cottage in Chalfont St. Giles in Buckinghamshire.  Four books long, this work is seen by some as a “brief epic”.

Thematic throughout the work is the reversal of that which was done in Paradise Lost.  There is also a literal and spiritual focus on hunger.  The story set out is that which tells of the divine stakes of Satan’s confrontation of Jesus.  Jesus, of course, is victorious.  Satan is amazed as he fails in all of his temptations.  All of this to mankind’s great and lasting benefit.

Paradise Regained  may be read here:

http://www.bartleby.com/4/501.html

Alternatively, this classic epic poem may be listened to in an audiobook format here:

 

About alohapromisesforever

Writer, poet, musician, surfer, father of two princesses and husband to Ally Romani.
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